Classics and Autism

Why Classical Myths can Chime with Autistic Experiences Professor Susan Deacy will be delivering a public lecture via Zoom, with BSL interpretation, on Wednesday 16 February 1pm-2pm. Register HERE Prof Susan Deacy will talk about her work with young people with autism, using classical mythology and the experiences and perceptions it highlights. This talk isContinue reading “Classics and Autism”

Votives in Manchester: International Day of Disabled People 2021

Inspired by Emma-Jayne Graham’s lecture on votives in Ancient Rome, Venture Arts developed a workshop with Manchester Histories, on votives which took place at Manchester’s celebration of IDDP21, Dr Graham’s work explores the experience of disability in Rome through the models of body parts which were left at shrines. These body parts often represented impairmentsContinue reading “Votives in Manchester: International Day of Disabled People 2021”

Intellectual Disability 1750-2021

Dr Simon Jarrett has spent many years working with people with learning disabilities and autism, and in this talk he explores how the idea of intellectual disability was developed in the 18th-20th centuries. To watch the video with captions and BSL click here Dr Simon Jarrett is an honorary research fellow at Birkbeck College, London. HavingContinue reading “Intellectual Disability 1750-2021”

Disability in the Ancient World

Dr Emma-Jayne Graham examines the votives, or models of body parts, made by or for disabled people and explores the experience of disability in the classical world. You can watch her talk here (This version has both BSL interpretation and captions).  Dr Emma-Jayne Graham is a Senior Lecturer in Classical Studies at the Open University withContinue reading “Disability in the Ancient World”

Disability in Ancient Rome

Dr Emma-Jayne Graham examines the votives, or models of body parts, made by or for disabled people and explores the experience of disability in the classical world. You can watch her talk here (please note this version has captions only, a BSL interpreted version will be uploaded shortly). Dr Emma-Jayne Graham is a Senior Lecturer inContinue reading “Disability in Ancient Rome”

Miraculous Cures and Pilgrimage in Manchester

Dr Kathryn Hurlock (Manchester Metropolitan University) Dr Hurlock explores the history of pilgrimage and ideas of miraculous cures in 19th and 20th century Manchester. She focuses on the popular pilgrimage site of Holywell in Wales (known as the ‘Lourdes of Wales’) to show how ideas around ‘healing’ and miracles shaped experiences of disabled people. ToContinue reading “Miraculous Cures and Pilgrimage in Manchester”

Hearing Happiness

Our celebrations of UK Disability History Month started with an entertaining and informative talk by Professor Jaipreet Virdi, an award winning activist, writer and historian. Professor Virdi presented compelling arguments about ideas of disability, views of deafness in 20th century America and explored the evolution of hearing aids. If you missed the event, for aContinue reading “Hearing Happiness”

Perceptions of Madness

Sarah K. Hitchen, PhD student Manchester Metropolitan University For many people with schizophrenia and other serious mental disorders, the people who initially identify that something is wrong are not medics, but family members.[1] A quick internet search reveals numerous websites and fact sheets providing information and advice for family and friends who are concerned that aContinue reading “Perceptions of Madness”

Culture in Quarantine: A Manifesto for 2050

Dr Kai Syng Tan, an artist based at MMU and a member of the ‘Cultures of Disability’ research group was commissioned to produce film for the BBC this summer, as part of the BBC Arts’ Culture In Quarantine initiative, which has brought the arts into people’s homes during lockdown. Her film, How To Thrive In 2050! 8Continue reading “Culture in Quarantine: A Manifesto for 2050”